Glenside Book Club - Good Books, Great Company, and a Snack!

Join the Glenside Book Club for a lively discussion about books and reading…and a snack!


 Conference Room A


Last Tuesday of every month (unless otherwise noted)

What time:

7:00 p.m.

Stop at the Circulation Desk for a copy of each month’s book. No registration or Glenside Library card is needed.

For more information call 630-260-1550 or email  -



Join us on Tuesday, November 17 when we will talk about "Gilead"

by Marilynne Robinson

The narrator, John Ames, is 76, a preacher who has lived almost all of his life in Gilead, Iowa. He is writing a letter to his almost seven-year-old son.

The reason for the letter is Ames's failing health. He wants to leave an account of himself for this son who will never really know him. His greatest regret is that he hasn't much to leave them, in worldly terms. "Your mother told you I'm writing your begats, and you seemed very pleased with the idea. Well, then. What should I record for you?" In the course of the narrative, John Ames records himself, inside and out, in a meditative style. Ames writes of his father and grandfather, estranged over his grandfather's departure for Kansas to march for abolition and his father's lifelong pacifism. The tension between them, their love for each other and their inability to bridge the chasm of their beliefs is a constant source of rumination for John Ames.

The other constant in the book is Ames's friendship since childhood with "old Boughton," a Presbyterian minister. Boughton, father of many children, favors his son, named John Ames Boughton, above all others. Ames must constantly monitor his tendency to be envious of Boughton's bounteous family; his first wife died in childbirth and the baby died almost immediately after her. Jack Boughton is a ne'er-do-well, Ames knows it and strives to love him as he knows he should. Jack arrives in Gilead after a long absence, full of charm and mischief, causing Ames to wonder what influence he might have on Ames's young wife and son when Ames dies.

These are the things that Ames tells his son about: his ancestors, the nature of love and friendship, the part that faith and prayer play in every life and an awareness of one's own culpability. There is also reconciliation without resignation, self-awareness without deprecation, abundant good humor, philosophical queries--Jack asks, "'Do you ever wonder why American Christianity seems to wait for the real thinking to be done elsewhere?'"--and an ongoing sense of childlike wonder at the beauty and variety of God's world.

Gilead (Gilead, #1)


Join us on Tuesday, December 15 for a SPECIAL AUTHOR TALK.

MARY KUBICA will be joining us to talk about her bestselling books.


New York Times bestselling author of The Good Girl and Pretty Baby comes to GPLD for a one of a kind reading, question and answer session event. Books will be available for sale and signing after the program.